By Choice or By Influence


Having been taught by social psychology that people are situational beings and that one’s attitude is formed as an afterthought of his observed behavior, I sometimes wonder why people do the things they do and in the process, come into conflict with my ideology that all our actions are done by choice. Still, it’s easy to say that some people simply make bad choices for themselves due to lack of proper judgment when those people do not include anyone I care about, myself included. And when it does, just knowing about the possibility of being influenced by ill situations leaves a bit of doubt in my own conviction and judgment.

Then again, social psychology resolves that conflict when I realize that outside influences that strongly contradict one’s personal beliefs often reinforces the beliefs rather than change them.

By Choice or By Influence

The Principles of Design: Color Harmony


Originally posted on The Daily Post:

Hi bloggers! My name’s Kjell Reigstad, and I’m a designer at Automattic. This is part three in my monthly series on “The Principles of Design.” In this series, I share some of the basic tenets of design, and we explore how to apply them to your blog.

So far, we’ve discussed clarity and visual hierarchy.

Colors can be very powerful. They stir up our emotions, convey personal and cultural messages, and set the mood. A bright red can shout “Stop!” while a deep blue can be calming and quiet. While individual colors say a lot on their own, most of what we see in the world involves more than one color. The way those colors work together is called color harmony.

Have you ever noticed that a bright pink rose stands out against a green bush? Or that a blue top goes well with khaki pants? That’s basic

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The Principles of Design: Color Harmony

The Principles of Design: Clarity


Originally posted on The Daily Post:

Hi bloggers! My name’s Kjell Reigstad, and I’m a designer at Automattic. I’m happy to introduce the first post in a new monthly series on “The Principles of Design.” In this series, I’ll share some of the basic tenets of design, and we’ll explore how to apply them to your blog.

This week, we start out with a simple design concept: telling a clear story.

The main goal of any design is to get a message across. It may be a straightforward message (“Buy this product!”), or it may be a complicated one, but in all cases, there’s a story to be told. In an excellent design, every shape, color, photograph, and font choice works together to create a strong, clear message. Great designers add elements that contribute, and (just as importantly!), they weed out elements that distract.

The classic Joseph Müller-Brockmann poster below is a great example of design elements…

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The Principles of Design: Clarity

The Principles of Design: Visual Hierarchy


Originally posted on The Daily Post:

Hi bloggers! My name’s Kjell Reigstad, and I’m a designer at Automattic. This is part two in my monthly series on “The Principles of Design.” In this series, I share some of the basic tenets of design, and we explore how to apply them to your blog.

Last month, we explored Clarity.

As I mentioned in last month’s column, the main goal of any design is to tell a story. Just as any good story has a beginning, middle, and end, a good design story does too! It’s up to a designer to make sure that people progress through their stories in a way that makes sense. One of the key ways to do that is to establish a clear visual hierarchy to guide the viewer’s eyes through the design.

Let’s go through a quick example. Take a look at the image below. Which of these two…

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The Principles of Design: Visual Hierarchy

Two Free Tools for Non-Designers: Canva and Pablo


Originally posted on The Daily Post:

Getting Started: To use Canva, you need to sign up for an account. Pablo, on the other hand, doesn’t require an account — just visit the Pablo page and start tinkering. Both are free to use, but note that Canva includes images you can buy for a small fee, too.

Given the popularity of our posts on designing custom image widgets and headers, photo apps, and free-to-use image resources, here’s a peek at two free tools that can help you create customized widgets, headers, and other extras for your blog: Canva, a program to make images and designs of all kinds and sizes; and Pablo, a tool to build social media posts, created by Buffer. I’ve been using both recently for design and image purposes: each have their pros and cons, but overall are great tools to try.

We’ve published tutorials using other free design and image…

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Two Free Tools for Non-Designers: Canva and Pablo

For the love of games


Originally posted on Taking Over The World With Games:

I’ve always dreamed of making a game that I can be proud of. Creating this blog seemed like a good start, but focus is the one thing that I had a hard time doing these past months. I’ve become occupied with work and things like web development tutorials, entrepreneurship classes, user experience materials, stocks and many other unrelated things.

Game development has taken a step back but it won’t be left untouched along with the pair of imaginary roller blades in third grade. I am doing it now equipped with unrelated but possibly helpful things that I picked up as I was wandering around.

I’ve recently enrolled in a Unity3D game development class for beginners by O’Reilly Media on Udemy, my first ever paid online class, which I bought on a 65% discount and haven’t started yet. I will post updates about my progress on this blog, and I’m…

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For the love of games